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Commercial Auto Rates Face New Headwinds

More accidents attributed to smartphone use while driving, coupled with much higher costs of repairs, have led to double-digit increases in commercial auto insurance rates over the past few years.

Distracted driving is just one of many factors that have converged on commercial auto insurance claims, resulting in sustained premium increases. Now there are new factors that are coming into play that will ensure that rates continue climbing, at least in the near term.

Commercial auto rates are increasing for companies with large fleets as well as for businesses with just a few vehicles and drivers. Here’s what’s at play and what you need to be aware of in the future.

Continuing factors

Distracted driving – This is the biggie. Starting a few years after the advent of smartphones in 2009, the steady decline in vehicle accidents and claims costs started to reverse when vehicular deaths started increasing for the first time in decades. The culprit, say many transportation safety experts, is distracted driving.

Repair costs – The cost of repairing vehicles has skyrocketed as cars have become more technologically advanced. A 2018 research paper by AAA found that vehicles equipped with advanced driver-assistance systems (ADAS) can cost twice as much to repair following a collision, due to expensive sensors and calibration requirements.

AAA cited the cost of repairing a car with windshield damage if it has an ADAS. The system uses cameras that are installed behind the windshield. These cameras need to be recalibrated after a windshield is replaced. This has increased the cost replacing such windshields to about $1,500, compared to $500 for a standard windshield.

Medical costs – Health insurance premiums and medical costs have been rising at a steady clip. Those increases carry over into the costs auto insurance companies incur when drivers and passengers are injured in an accident.

More miles driven – According to AAA, Americans are spending more time on the road. Driving more miles increases motorists’ likelihood of having an accident.

New and future risks

Weather-related property claims – A recent report in the insurance publication National Underwriter noted that commercial auto insurers say that the increasing frequency of large hurricanes, floods, hailstorms and wildfires are leading to higher auto physical damage claims. The number of property claims has been steadily increasing in the past decade as both the frequency and severity of major weather events grow.

Lack of experienced drivers – As the economy expands, it’s become more difficult to find experienced drivers. Many experienced commercial drivers are retiring, and there are not enough job candidates with the skills and expertise needed to drive commercial vehicles.
The American Trucking Associations estimates that the industry is understaffed by more than 50,000 drivers, and this could increase more than threefold within eight years if current trends continue.

Security with onboard systems – As more vehicle functions become automated, new risks could surface from system failures that may result in accidents. There are number of technologies that come into play in new vehicles and a highly automated vehicle will rely on array of devices, including radar, light detection and ranging, cameras, graphics-processing units and central processing units.


Don’t Overlook Equipment Breakdown Insurance

Imagine it’s a typical July day. You own a 30,000-square-foot office building that is 85% occupied. And the air conditioning and ventilation systems stop working. The outside temperature is in the 90s and the humidity is high. It doesn’t take long before the tenants start to complain.

The contractor you summon determines that an electrical arc fried the circuit board that controls the systems.

The board must be replaced, but it will take up to five business days for it to arrive. In the meantime, the building is unfit for people to work in, and the leases oblige you to credit tenants’ rents for periods when the building in uninhabitable for more than a day. In short, you face thousands of dollars in repairs and much more in lost rents.

While your property insurance policy will cover the resulting property damage from fires or explosions, it will not cover the equipment or lost income from the downtime during repairs.

But equipment breakdown insurance will.

Equipment breakdown insurance

This form of insurance is not a substitute for other property coverage. It will not pay for damage caused by fire, lightning, explosions from sources other than pressure vessels, floods, earthquakes, vandalism, and other causes of loss covered elsewhere.

Equipment breakdown policies are designed to fill in the gaps left by other policies, not to replace them. Also, they do not cover mechanical breakdowns that result from normal wear and tear as a device ages.

A number of events can trigger a claim for equipment, such as:

  • Mechanical breakdown in equipment that generates, transmits or uses energy, including telephone and computer systems.
  • Electrical surges that damage appliances, devices or wiring.
  • Boiler explosions, ruptures or bursts.
  • Events inside steam boilers and pipes or hot water heaters and similar equipment that damages them.

Business owners often overlook equipment breakdown coverage. Bur, virtually all of them have some need for this insurance.

What equipment breakdown insurance covers:

  • The cost of repairing or replacing the equipment.
  • Lost business income from a covered event.
  • Extra expenses you incur due to a covered event.
  • Limited coverage for losses like food spoilage in freezers that break down.

Most businesses rely heavily on machines in their daily operations, from computers to refrigeration equipment and elevators to manufacturing equipment.

For some, the cost of repairs to this equipment and resulting downtime can have a serious impact. Such businesses should seriously consider buying equipment breakdown insurance.
Call us if you would like to discuss this crucial form of coverage.


Employee Embezzlement on the Rise – Are You Protected?

A typical organization will lose an estimated 5% of its revenues every year due to fraud, according to a study by the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners.

The median loss among organizations both large and small was $140,000 per occurrence, and more than 20% of embezzlement losses were more than $1 million, the association found.

With those staggering numbers in mind, if you have not already done so, you need to take steps to reduce the possibility of employee theft – and also make sure you are adequately covered if they do steal from you.

Small organizations are especially susceptible to losses from employee embezzlement. These problems are often seen in cash-heavy businesses, or those with large inventories, but employee embezzlement is most frequently experienced in organizations lacking owner oversight of financial processes, usually due to placing far too much trust in employees and having no internal controls.

The new study by the fraud examiners association was released as another study, this one by professional security firm Marquet International, found that arrests and indictments for embezzlements had reached a five-year high in 2012.

Embezzlers are most likely to be a company bookkeeper, accountant or treasurer, who is female, in her 40s, and without a criminal record. The reason it’s more often than not a woman is that they are typically in the three aforementioned jobs.

How do they do it?

Marquet International in its study found that the most common ways of embezzling are:

  • Bogus loan schemes, which include cases in which fraudulent loans are created or authorized by the perpetrator from which funds are taken for their own benefit.
  • Credit card/account fraud cases, which involve the fraudulent or unauthorized creation and/or use of company credit card or credit accounts.
  • Forged/unauthorized check cases, which are those in which company checks are forged or issued without authorization for the benefit of the perpetrator.
  • Fraudulent reimbursement schemes, which include expense report fraud and other cases in which a bogus submission for reimbursement is made by the perpetrator.
  • Inventory/equipment theft schemes, including those cases in which physical corporate assets were stolen and sold or used for the benefit of the employee.
  • Payroll shenanigan cases, including all forms of manipulation of the payroll systems in order for the perpetrator to draw additional income.
  • Theft/conversion of cash receipt cases, which involve the simple taking of cash or checks meant for company receipts and pocketing or converting them for one’s own benefit.
  • Unauthorized electronic funds transfers, including those cases in which wire transfers and other similar transfers of funds are the primary mode of theft.
  • Vendor fraud cases, which include those where either a bogus vendor is created by the perpetrator to misappropriate monies or a real vendor colludes with the perpetrator to siphon funds from the company.

Thwarting embezzlers

Liability insurer Camico suggests that educating employees on the detrimental effects of employee fraud on the organization can reduce the likelihood of embezzlement.

Also, if you implement a regular review of bank and credit card statements, you’ll have a better chance of catching a thief. Company owners should look at the cleared transactions to determine the legitimacy of payees, including examining actual cancelled checks.

Also, it’s easy for transactions to be changed in the accounting system after the fact. An ill-intentioned bookkeeper could use this tactic to cover up their tracks. If you feel you do not have the time or expertise to oversee you finance department, you should contract with a qualified CPA to perform these checks and balances.

There are also inexpensive physical barriers that should be used to deter criminal activity. To protect cash, you can buy a $200 drop-slot safe to securely keep the night’s deposit until it is taken to the bank.

Similarly, security cameras deter misbehavior and can be the source of valuable evidence in case an incident occurs.

Securing coverage

Finally, you should consider taking out a crime insurance policy.

Most business insurance policies either exclude or provide only nominal amounts of coverage for loss of money and securities as well as employee-dishonesty exposures.

But a crime insurance policy protects against loss of money, securities or inventory resulting from crime. Common crime insurance claims include employee dishonesty, embezzlement, forgery, robbery, safe burglary, computer fraud, wire-transfer fraud, and counterfeiting.

Call us to discuss whether a crime policy is right for your company.


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